In-game Advertising forum speaker list finalized

The first-ever Advertising in Games Forum announced the final lineup of speakers for its April 14 event at the Metropolitan Pavilion in New York City. The keynote speaker will be Mitch Davis, CEO of Massive. Execs from Activision, NPD Group, The Georgia Institute of Technology, Vivendi, Bounce Interactive and the United Talent Agency are also participating. The event is designed to explore current trends surrounding the addition of commercial ads into games. More Information at the In-Game Ad Forum Website

Pimp My Burger – Burger King gone Viral

Burger King has gone viral again with PimpMyBurger, a site dedicated to some dudes rapping about a chicken burger getting pimped, thus spoofing the popular reality show, Pimp My Ride on MTV. They’ve basically copied the full script while adding their own pimperage to the show.
This campaign could be very successful in the young age group because it’s just a hell lot of fun while watching.

Google Introduces Image Ads

Google has just introduced its enhanced AdSense program to a group of selected clients. Next to the well-known text ads, publishers can now incorporate more “eye-catching” ads (= blinking gif banners) in their site. Google limits the size of animated GIFs to 50 kilobytes, AdSense publishers need only opt-in to increase their money generating possibilities.

The feedback has been mixed so far, as Google’s price model is based on a cost-per-click (CPC) basis and advertisers claim, this model is not suitable for GIF banners, which can have a branding value even if consumers don’t click on them. For this reason, banners are traditionally sold based on cost-per-thousand impression basis.

When it gets to online advertising in general, the ad format 468×60 has always been a standard and could remain so for the upcoming years. But there are way prettier and more effective ad formats on the market, ie the “Leaderboard” with 728×90 and the “Skyscraper” with 120×600. A lot of well-known online-magazines use them: wired.com, slashdot.org, spiegel.de. These specific ad formats enable a less intrusive way of catching the visitor/consumer as they’re not directly embedded into the content but remain at the outer edges of a website.

I’d prefer interesting image ads more than those boring non-multimedia text ads. But when is advertising actually fun and catchy? The online advertising industry still has a long way to go.